• MONDAY-FRIDAY AFTER MAKE IT WITH YOU
  • MONDAY-FRIDAY AFTER MAKE IT WITH YOU
Sid Lucero’s Furry Friends and Gaming Rig

During free days, the furry friends of Sid Lucero serve as his ultimate stress-reliever.

 

 

The pet lover has a total of four dogs and three cats, mostly adopted, that all sleep with him in one room. He has Marley – a mix of Persian and Siamese breed – the one he considers as bunso among the brood because of its clingy nature. He’s got a blue-eyed dog named Felix adopted two years ago; his giant baby dog, Yumi; Sophie adopted from his manager; and the cheery Piper that likes to open the car door and window for him. How do they sleep altogether, you ask? “Piper and Felix are between me and my girlfriend, Annicka. Sophie stays on the other side of Annicka while Yumi sleeps on the floor,” Sid reveals. He doesn’t train his pets with tricks but he rather teaches them obedience and plays with them like little kids

 

 

Sometimes, while the adorable creatures chill around his peripherals, Sid fights the boredom by playing online and video games. He owns a gaming PC set-up in one corner of his room. Sid used to be a hardcore gamer along with his cousins and he didn’t mind spending money on it. But, now as a practical Dad, he learned to tone down the expenses and look at gaming as just a pastime activity. He is even proud to showcase his low-cost equipment like the keyboard he scored from an online shop at Php800 and the computer mouse he got from Annicka. If able to save up, though, he’d like to build a more ‘special’ gaming rig. Among his current gaming picks are Call of Duty, GOT Online, and Diablo 3.

 

 

The ways he spends time at home – chill and easygoing – is a stark contrast to his life in front of the cameras. As someone who hails from a clan of formidable character actors, Sid is often tapped to portray as the vile guy in teleseryes. And he does it with impeccable mastery like what he delivers in A Soldier’s Heart where he plays as Saal Alhuraji aka Abdul Waajid, the leader of a terror group driven to avenge his rebel father’s death.

 

A Soldier’s Heart is yet another venue to showcase Sid’s outstanding acting prowess as a kontrabida. He is, after all, more engrossed in diving deeper into antagonist roles than playing good guys because of the freedom to explore his character’s flexibility. And he likes it best when the material is unconventional, real, and significant.